Beverly Hills Los Angeles, California

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Beverly Hills is located in Los Angeles County, California, United States. It is surrounded by the City of Los Angeles. Beverly Hills is one of Los Angeles’ most popular destinations for locals and tourists. It is the land of stars, dreams, great food and expensive shopping, this affluent nook of Southern California is the real-life version of the quintessential LA glitz and glam so often seen in movies. It was on Rodeo Drive where Julia Roberts had her famous Pretty Woman shopping spree and it was at an upscale café called Kate Mantilini where Robert De Niro and Al Pacino made their legendary first on-screen appearance together in the movie Heat. Beyond some of the most famous Hollywood moments, Beverly Hills is also known for an abundance of lavish estates and beautiful architecture. Visitors to LA can see the largest mansion ever built in Los Angeles, Greytone Mansion. Greystone Mansion has been used in many popular films, such as Indecent Proposal. With all there is to see in this SoCal dreamland, guided tours often come in handy.

Beverly Hills is noted for its luxurious culture and its famous residents, which include CEOs, heirs and heiresses, foreign and domestic dignitaries, authors, artists, professionals, and TV or film celebrities as well as other entertainment personalities, executives, and media creatives. It is also home to the famous upscale shopping district Rodeo drive.

With a population of 34,109 at the 2010 census, up from 33,784 as of the 2000 census. Beverly Hills residents include CEOs, heirs and heiresses, foreign and domestic dignitaries, authors, artists, professionals, and TV or film celebrities as well as other entertainment personalities, executives, and media creatives. As of the 2010 census, Beverly Hills is home to fewer children under 5 years old (about half as many, on average) than live in the entire state of California, and the city is home to almost twice as many seniors over the age of 65.

Beverly Hills and the neighboring city of West Hollywood are together entirely surrounded by the city of Los Angeles. To be specific, Beverly Hills is bordered on the northwest by the Los Angeles neighborhood of Bel-Air and the Santa Monica Mountains, on the east by West Hollywood, the Carthay neighborhood of Los Angeles, and the Fairfax District of Los Angeles, and on the south by the Beverlywood. The area’s “Platinum Triangle” of affluent neighborhoods is formed by the city of Beverly Hills and the Los Angeles neighborhoods of Bel Air and Holmby Hills.

 

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Autry National Center Museum

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The Autry National Center of the American West is an intercultural center and museum in Los Angeles, California that celebrates the diversity and history of the American West through three important institutions: the Southwest Museum of the American Indian, the Museum of the American West, and the Institute for the Study of the American West. The Autry’s museum mission is to explore the experiences and perceptions of the diverse peoples of the American West, connecting the past with the present to inform our shared future. All of the exhibitions, public programs, K-12 educational services and publications are designed to further this mission. Located at the Museum of the American West, the Wells Fargo Theater is also part of the center.

Please visit Autry National Center Museum site for more information.

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Aquarium of the Pacific

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Aquarium of the Pacific is a world-class aquarium in Los Angeles featuring more than 11,000 animals representing over 500 different species. The Aquarium sees about 1.5 million visitors every year. It is located on the Rainbow Harbor in Long Beach, California.

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Los Angeles Attractions

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Aquarium of the Pacific

Autry National Center Museum

Beverly Hills

Chinatown

Cabrillo Marine Aquarium

California Heritage Museum

California Science Center IMAX Movie

Discovery Science Center

Disneyland

Disneyland Resort

Downtown Los Angeles

Flagship Cruises

Getty Museum

Griffith Park Observatory

Grauman’s Chinese Theatre

GRAMMY Museum

Hollywood Museum

Hollywood Walk of Fame

Hollywood Sign

Hop-on Hop-off Yellow Route Tour departing Santa Monica

Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

Japanese American National Museum

K1 Speed Indoor Karting

Knott’s Berry Farm

Kodak Theatre® Guided Tour

LEGOLAND® California

Page Museum – La Brea Tar Pits

Little Tokyo

Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens

Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Madame Tussauds Hollywood

Malibu Celebrity Homes Tour by Star line

MOCA Grand Avenue

Movie Star Homes Tour by LA City Tours

Museum of Tolerance

Olvera Street

Pacific Ocean

Pacific Park on the Santa Monica Pier

Paramount Pictures Studio Tour

Petersen Automotive Museum

Queen Mary

Rodeo Drive

Red Line Hollywood Behind-the-Scenes Tour

Santa Monica Historical Society Museum

Santa Monica Pier Aquarium

Santa Monica State Beach

Six Flags Magic Mountain

Skirball Cultural Center

Sony Pictures Studios Tour

Spirit Cruises: Long Beach

Spirit Cruises: Los Angeles Harbor

Spokes N Stuff Rentals: Griffith Park

Spokes N Stuff Rentals: Santa Monica

Sunset Boulevard

Stars Homes

TV Show Taping

Universal City Walk

Universal Studios Hollywood

Venice Beach

Walt Disney Concert Hall

Warner Bros. Studio VIP Tour

Whale Watching Cruise by Newport Landing

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Los Angeles

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Los Angeles is the most populous city in the state of California, and the second most populous in the United States after New York City. It has an area of 468.67 square miles and is located in Southern California. It has a population of about 3,792,621. Often known by its initials LA, the city is the focal point of the larger Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana metropolitan statistical area, which contains 12,828,837 people as of 2010, and is one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world and the second largest in the United States of America. Los Angeles is also the seat of Los Angeles County, the most populated and one of the most ethnically diverse counties in the United States, while the entire Los Angeles area itself has been recognized as the most diverse of the nation’s largest cities. The city’s inhabitants are referred to as “Angelenos”.

Los Angeles was founded on September 4, 1781, by Spanish governor Felipe de Neve. It became a part of Mexico in 1821 following the Mexican War of Independence. In 1848, at the end of the Mexican–American War, Los Angeles and the rest of California were purchased as part of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, there by becoming part of the United States. Los Angeles was incorporated as a municipality on April 4, 1850, five months before California achieved statehood.

Nicknamed the City of Angels, Los Angeles is a world center of business, international trade, entertainment, culture, media, fashion, science, sports, technology, and education. It is home to renowned institutions covering a broad range of professional and cultural fields and is one of the most substantial economic engines within the United States. Los Angeles has been ranked the third richest city and fifth most powerful and influential city in the world. The Los Angeles combined statistical area has a gross metropolitan product of $831 billion (as of 2008), making it the third largest economic center in the world, after the Greater Tokyo and New York metropolitan areas. As the home base of Hollywood, it is also known as the “Entertainment Capital of the World,” leading the world in the creation of television and stage production, motion pictures, video games, and recorded music. The importance of the entertainment business to the city has led many celebrities to call Los Angeles and its surrounding suburbs home. Additionally, Los Angeles hosted the 1932 and 1984 Summer Olympics.

The city is divided into over 80 districts and neighborhoods, many of which were incorporated places or communities that were annexed by the city. Greater Los Angeles includes a number of enclaves and nearby communities. Generally, the city is divided into the following areas: Downtown Los Angeles, East Los Angeles and Northeast Los Angeles, South Los Angeles, the Harbor Area, Greater Hollywood, Wilshire, the Westside, and the San Fernando and Crescenta Valleys.

Some well-known communities within Los Angeles include West Adams, Watts, Leimert Park, Baldwin Hills, Venice, the Downtown Financial District, Los Feliz, Silver Lake, Hollywood, Koreatown, Westwood and the more affluent areas of Bel Air, Benedict Canyon, Hollywood Hills, Hancock Park, Pacific Palisades, Century City, and Brentwood.

Important landmarks in Los Angeles include Walt Disney Concert Hall, the Kodak Theatre, the Griffith Observatory, the Getty Center, the Getty Villa, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, the Hollywood Sign, the Bradbury Building, Hollywood Boulevard, the Capitol Records Building, Los Angeles City Hall, the Hollywood Bowl, the Theme Building, the Watts Towers, Staples Center, Dodger Stadium and La Placita Olvera/Olvera Street.

There are 841 museums and art galleries in Los Angeles County. In fact, Los Angeles has more museums per capita than any other city in the world. Some of the notable museums are the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (the largest art museum in the Western United States), the Getty Center (part of the larger J. Paul Getty Trust, the world’s wealthiest art institution) and the Museum of Contemporary Art. A significant number of art galleries are located on Gallery Row, and tens of thousands attend the monthly Downtown Art Walk there.

The main Los Angeles airport is Los Angeles International Airport – LAX. It is the sixth busiest commercial airport in the world and the third busiest in the United States. LAX handled over 61 million passengers and 2 million tons of cargo in 2006. LAX is a hub for United States.

The Los Angeles coastal area was first settled by the Tongva and Chumash Native American tribes thousands of years ago. Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo, a Portuguese-born explorer, claimed the area of southern California for the Spanish Empire in 1542. Gaspar de Portolà and Franciscan missionary Juan Crespí, reached the present site of Los Angeles on August 2, 1769.

In 1771, Franciscan friar Junípero Serra directed the building of the Mission San Gabriel Arcangel, the first mission in the area. On September 4, 1781, a group of forty-four settlers known as “Los Pobladores” founded the pueblo called “La Reyna de los Angeles”, named for Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río de Porciúncula (Our Lady the Queen of the Angels of the Porciúncula River). Two-thirds of the settlers were mestizo or mulatto with African, Amerindian, and European ancestry. The settlement remained a small ranch town for decades, but by 1820 the population had increased to about 650 residents. Today, the pueblo is commemorated in the historic district of Los Angeles Pueblo Plaza and Olvera Street, the oldest part of Los Angeles.

New Spain achieved its independence from the Spanish Empire in 1821, and the pueblo continued as a part of Mexico. Governor Pío Pico, made Los Angeles, California’s regional capital during Mexican rule, which ended during the Mexican–American War: Americans took control from the Californios after a series of battles, culminating with the signing of the Treaty of Cahuenga on January 13, 1847.

Railroads arrived with the completion of the Southern Pacific line to Los Angeles in 1876. Oil was discovered in 1892, and by 1923, the discoveries had helped California become the country’s largest oil producer, accounting for about one-quarter of the world’s petroleum output.

By 1900, the population had grown to more than 102,000 people, putting pressure on the city’s water supply. The completion of the Los Angeles Aqueduct in 1913, under the supervision of William Mulholland, assured the continued growth of the city.

In 1910, not only had the city of Los Angeles just annexed Hollywood, but there were already at least ten movie companies operating in the city. By 1921, more than 80% of the world’s film industry was concentrated in L.A. The money generated by the industry kept the city relatively insulated from much of the economic pain suffered by the rest of the country during the Great Depression. By 1930, the population surpassed one million. In 1932, the city hosted the Summer Olympics. The Los Angeles Coliseum hosted the Olympic Games in 1932 and 1984.

After the Second World War, the city grew more rapidly than ever, sprawling into the San Fernando Valley. In 1969, Los Angeles became one of the birthplaces of the Internet, as the first ARPANET transmission was sent from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) to SRI in Menlo Park.

In 1984, the city hosted the Summer Olympic Games for the second time. Despite being boycotted by 14 Communist countries, the 1984 Olympics became vastly more financially successful than any previous and only the second Olympics to turn a profit until then – the other, according to an analysis of contemporary newspaper reports, being the 1932 Summer Olympics, also held in Los Angeles.

Racial tensions erupted on April 29, 1992, with the acquittal by a Simi Valley jury of the police officers captured on videotape beating Rodney King, culminating in large-scale riots. In 1994, the 6.7 Northridge earthquakes shook the city, causing $12.5 billion in damage and 72 deaths. The century ended with the Rampart scandal, one of the most extensive cases of police misconduct in American history.

Los Angeles is irregularly shaped and covers a total area of 502.7 square miles, comprising 468.7 square miles of land and 34.0 square miles of water. The city extends for 44 miles longitudinally and for 29 miles latitudinally. The perimeter of the city is 342 miles.

Los Angeles is both flat and hilly. Mount Lukens is the highest point in the city reaching 5,074 ft, located at the northeastern end of the San Fernando Valley. The eastern end of the Santa Monica Mountains stretches from Downtown to the Pacific Ocean and separates the Los Angeles Basin from the San Fernando Valley. Other hilly parts of Los Angeles include the Mt. Washington area north of Downtown, eastern parts such as Boyle Heights, the Crenshaw district around the Baldwin Hills, and the San Pedro district.

The Los Angeles River, which is largely seasonal, is the primary drainage channel. It was straightened and lined in 51 miles of concrete by the Army Corps of Engineers to act as a flood control channel. The river begins in the Canoga Park district of the city, flows east from the San Fernando Valley along the north edge of the Santa Monica Mountains, and turns south through the city center, flowing to its mouth in the Port of Long Beach at the Pacific Ocean. The smaller Ballona Creek flows into the Santa Monica Bay at Playa del Rey.

The Los Angeles area is rich in native plant species due in part to a diversity in habitats, including beaches, wetlands, and mountains. The most prevalent botanical environment is coastal sage scrub which covers the hillsides in combustible chaparral. Native plants include: California poppy, matilija poppy, toyon, Coast Live Oak, and Giant Wildrye. Many of these native species, such as the Los Angeles sunflower, have become as rare as to be considered endangered. Though it is not native to the area, the official tree of Los Angeles is the Coral Tree and the official flower of Los Angeles is the Bird of Paradise. Mexican Fan Palms, California Fan Palms, and Canary Island Palms can be seen throughout the Los Angeles area, despite the latter being non-indigenous to Southern California.

Los Angeles is subject to earthquakes due to its location on the Pacific Ring of Fire. The geologic instability has produced numerous faults, which cause approximately 10,000 earthquakes annually. One of the major faults is the San Andreas Fault. Located at the boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate, it is predicted to be the source of Southern California’s next big earthquake. Major earthquakes to have hit the Los Angeles area include the 1994 Northridge earthquake, the 1987 Whittier Narrows earthquake, the 1971 San Fernando earthquake near Sylmar, and the 1933 Long Beach earthquake. Nevertheless, all but a few quakes are of low intensity and are not felt. The Los Angeles basin and metropolitan area are also at risk from blind thrust earthquakes. Parts of the city are also vulnerable to tsunamis; harbor areas were damaged by waves from the Valdivia earthquake in 1960.

Los Angeles has a Subtropical-Mediterranean climate and receives just enough annual precipitation to avoid semi-arid climate classification. Los Angeles has plenty of sunshine throughout the year, with an average of only 35 days with measurable precipitation annually.

The average annual temperature in downtown is 66 °F (19 °C): 75 °F (24 °C) during the day and 57 °F (14 °C) at night. In the coldest month, January, the temperature typically ranges from 59 to 73 °F (15 to 23 °C) during the day and 45 to 55 °F (7 to 13 °C) at night. In the warmest month – August – the temperature typically ranges from 79 to 90 °F (26 to 32 °C) during the day and around 64 °F (18 °C) at night. Temperatures exceed 90 °F (32 °C) on a dozen or so days in the year, from one day a month in April, May, June and November to three days a month in July, August, October and to five days in September. Temperatures are subject to substantial daily swings; in inland areas the difference between the average daily low and the average daily high is over 30 °F (17 °C).The average annual temperature of the sea is 63 °F (17 °C), from 58 °F (14 °C) in January to 68 °F (20 °C) in August. Hours of sunshine total more than 3,000 per year, from an average of 7 hours of sunshine per day in December to an average of 12 in July.

The Los Angeles area is also subject to phenomena typical of a microclimate, causing extreme variations in temperature in close physical proximity to each other. For instance, the average July maximum temperature at the Santa Monica Pier is 75 °F (24 °C) whereas it is 95 °F (35 °C) in Canoga Park. The city, like much of the southern California coast, is subject to a late spring / early summer weather phenomenon called “June Gloom.” This involves overcast or foggy skies in the morning which yield to sun by early afternoon.

Downtown Los Angeles averages 15.14 inches of precipitation annually, which mainly occurs during the winter and spring (November through April) with generally moderate rain showers, but often as heavy rainfall and thunderstorms during winter storms. The coast gets slightly less rainfall, while the mountains get slightly more. However the San Fernando Valley Region of Los Angeles can get between 16 and 20 inches (410 and 510 mm) of rain per year. Years of average rainfall are rare; the usual pattern is bimodal, with a short string of dry years (perhaps 7–8 inches/180–200 millimeters) followed by one or two wet years that make up the average. Snowfall is extremely rare in the city basin, but the mountains within city limits typically receive snowfall every winter. The greatest snowfall recorded in downtown Los Angeles was 2 inches (5 cm) in 1932. The highest recorded temperature in downtown Los Angeles is 113 °F (45 °C) on September 27, 2010 and the lowest recorded temperature is 24 °F (−4 °C) on December 22, 1944.

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